Researchers Record World's Fastest Internet Speed of 44.2 Tbps!
Researchers Record World's Fastest Internet Speed of 44.2 Tbps!

Researchers have advanced in the field of new wired broadband, as they’ve just recorded the world’s fastest internet speed of 44.2 Tbps! This feat was achieved by researchers at RMIT, Monash, and Swinburne of Australia. They’ve tested this over w length of 75km between their campuses, using a new technology called micro-comb in standard fiber cables. Researchers are now trying to bring to low levels like us, as soon as possible.

A New World Record

Researchers Record World's Fastest Internet Speed of 44.2 Tbps!
Researchers Record World’s Fastest Internet Speed of 44.2 Tbps!

Internet speeds like 44.2 Tbps are astronomical, at least to this generation. We’ve stuck between Megabits and Gigabits of speeds, but the new record by Australian researchers pumps Terabits! This Terabit per second is the next level of Gigabits, used for important tech-related stuff and Megabits, used by home consumers like us. And we have a long time to experience them as the general public.

Researchers from Swinburne, Monash and RMIT have tested this fiber connection laid between RMIT’s Melbourne City campus and Monash University’s Clayton campus. The test fiber in this operation was the same used by Australia’s National Broadband Network (NBN). This gives hope that this development can be successful even on generic optic fibers we’re using, which is the new challenge researchers are trying on now.

Usage of a new technology called micro-comb chip in this operation is how researchers can pump up such speeds. This chip was embedded within the optical fiber cables, responsible for transmitting faster data rates. This newly recorded speed of 44.2 Tbps means one can download 50 movies of 100GB worth Ultra HD Blue-ray movies each.

While you may not be experiencing this new development anytime soon, such massive internet speeds will be first tried among data center connections. And will eventually be powering the future autonomous vehicles and others. So, goals for eliminating buffering like things are not even a scratch to scrub off. Read more about the project here.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here